Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘2006 CMCE’ Category


Aldo Smith (left), president and chief executive officer of AMK Communications Ltd., listens to Drs.. Marjan de Bruin, director of the Caribbean Institute of Media and Communication (CARIMAC), prior to signing a sponsorship agreement at the press launch of the Caribbean Media Conference and Expo and the Caribbean Peer Awards, held at the Hilton Kingston hotel in New Kingston on Thursday. – Ricardo Makyn/Staff Photographer

The US$3 million (J$195 million) expansion beginning next semester at the Caribbean Institute of Media and Communication (CARIMAC) is expected to assist the unit in keeping pace with the new developments in journalism, according to Director, Drs.. Marjan de Bruin.

Speaking at the press launch for next week’s Caribbean Media Conference and Exposition and Caribbean Peer Awards at the Hilton Kingston hotel in New Kingston Thursday, Drs.. de Bruin said CARIMAC would phase in two planned masters and three undergraduate degrees over the next five years.

Online learning

The institution will also establish a distance-learning programme.

CARIMAC will start a new UNESCO-funded course in online journalism for practitioners beginning in May.

“Graduates in the English speaking countries now have this increased market thanks to the Internet and also, within the diaspora, there is this hunger for news from home,” explained Drs.. de Bruin of the potential for online journalism.

She acknowledged that the current convergence of media platforms online – including blogs, slide shows, video, radio, podcasts and so-called ‘citizen journalism’ -was a new phenomenon and just starting in Jamaica.

Right persons

She noted recent mergers such as The Gleaner Power 106 news, which has seen reporters simultaneously producing print and radio reports.

“The challenge is to find the right persons … but I can’t teach … we have to get people with sufficient experience to get this further and stay close to what is happening in the newsrooms,” she explained.

She said that Steve Ross, editor of BroadbandMagazine and a former lecturer at the prestigious Colombia Journalism School, whom she described as a ‘friend of CARIMAC’, had already pledged his involvement in the online course.

http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060902/lead/lead8.html

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

KINGSTON, Jamaica – Cable and Wireless has officially announced its decision to co-sponsor, as Event Partner the 2006 Caribbean Media Conference and Exposition set for September 6-7th at the Hilton Kingston hotel, Mrs. Jackie Knight- Campbell Vice President for Public Relations at Cable and Wireless made the announcement.

“We are seeking to build a closer relationship and strategic partnership with regional media for one simple reason, the conversion and expansion between media and telecommunications. This we see as the future and as such we will seek every opportunity to ensure our market positioning, this event is a perfect example of us executing that strategy and we will be looking for more opportunities like this in the future.” She commented on the factors driving her company’s decision.


L-R: Jackie Knight-Campbell V.P Public Relations and Special Events-Cable and Wireless, Aldo Conference Project Director, Elaine Bryan Programme Consultant Caribbean Media Corporation, Michael Whyte, Commercial and New Business Development Manager, Caribbean Media Corporation.

Aldo, Project Director for the Conference and Exposition in commenting on the decision said, “ Given the way telecommunications was now impacting on media it was strategic to have a regional telecommunications company like Cable and Wireless on board. As a matter of fact one of our major presentations on Thursday September 7th asks the question “ is the telecommunications sector the new mediascape”.

The Cable and Wireless brand now joins Caribvision out of Barbados and BlackSlate from Jamaica as the brands that have aligned themselves with the event. Discussions are still taking place with a number of other international brands that have expressed an interest in supporting the event.

Aldo, in commenting on the conference speakers indicated that most of the targeted speakers have already been identified and confirmed and that the website www.caribbeanmediaconference.com, will be used to keep everybody updated.

The 2006 Caribbean Media Conference and Exposition will see a much larger group of exhibitors as it’s expected to get the full range of media opportunities now out there, with both old and new media platforms represented. With the growth in radio options, local cable channels, outdoor media, internet and even mobile, the organisers are hoping to attract these companies to exhibit and show the marketing community what they have to offer and the expanded choices for 2007.

Importantly a fair number of attendees from within and outside the region are expected, as marketing efforts to these companies and individuals have already started.

Read Full Post »

Peter Webley, publisher of the South Florida monthly newspaper, Caribbean Today, has been selected as a recipient of the Caribbean Peer Awards Life Time Achievement Award for 2006.

Mr. Webley was among four awardees, all Caribbean nationals, being honored for their sterling contribution to the growth and ongoing development of Caribbean media in the area of sales, marketing and advertising.

The other awardees include Messrs. Ken Gordon of Trinidad and Tobago, Lester Spaulding and Neville Blythe, both well-known Jamaican media personnel.

The honorees were selected from a list of ten Caribbean nationals, by the Peer Awards Foundation of AMK Communications.

Described as one of the pioneers of Caribbean news in South Florida, Mr. Webley launched the Caribbean monthly newspaper in December 1989. As the Caribbean Diaspora began to grow in the early eighties in this region, Mr. Webley told JIS News that he saw a need for greater and better news coverage of the Caribbean region and of the nationals here in Florida.

With a distribution of almost 40,000, circulation has grown outside the region to include Atlanta, Chicago, and other communities in Connecticut, New Jersey and New York, as well as some of the Caribbean islands.

The paper is free to the public and covers news, features, entertainment and sports especially related to the Caribbean community. Earlier, this year, the paper developed a website to include on-line readers. “Readers of Caribbean Today would also note a refreshingly positive portrayal of minorities,” the publisher added.

A recent audit conducted by the City of Miami Metro Communications Department, indicated that among 72 publications Caribbean Today ranked sixth overall, and first among the black population in this region.

A recipient of several awards over the years, Mr. Webley was inducted in May last year, into the Miami Hall of Fame for his outstanding contribution in the area of journalism.

Other outstanding awards for business development and community contribution include the United Coalition of Minority Business Enterprises 2003, the Minority Enterprise Development (MED Week) Award 2003, and the Broward Black Elected Officials’ Business Leader Award 2006.

He has also received other awards from several schools in the South Florida community, where he continues to work with students on varied educational projects.

Webley is also a founding member of the Florida-based Jamaica USA Chamber of Commerce (JAUSACC) and the Kendal South Dade chapter of the Kiwanis Club.

According to Webley, Caribbean Today is now a thriving news magazine that has contributed greatly to raising the positive profile of South Florida’s Caribbean community. “Perhaps our most poignant achievement is that by providing the community with a positive reflection of its many faces, the paper has helped the community to understand the diverse cultures that embrace this community,” he added.

The Peer Awards Foundation was incepted in 1998 by AMK Communications to recognize Jamaican media personnel in the areas of marketing, advertising and sales. This year, the program was developed to include the Caribbean media community.

The awards presentation program will be held next Thursday, (Sept. 7) at the Pegasus Hotel in Kingston at the close of the Caribbean Media Conference and Exposition.

http://www.jamaicans.com/news/announcements/peerwards2006.shtml

Read Full Post »

Ø Are you chasing audiences across multiple media platforms, and even when you succeed in getting consumers’ attention, it’s getting harder to finesse a response?

Ø Are consumers saying, ‘No more. They don’t want to be bombarded with advertising messages.”

Ø Are you clamouring to expose your brand of products and services to an increasingly younger, mobile, technologically exposed and educated populous in an increasingly fragmented and specialised media environment.

Ø Did you know that media today abounds with opportunities, however because the information landscape is constantly changing and evolving staying abreast of developments and technology in-order to make better returns on media purchases and more informed media decisions is more challenging.

Ø Technological developments taking place in the Telecommunications sector and the Mobile/cell phone industry are and will continue to have a profound impact on media and are changing the face of media as we know it today. Do you know really know how?

Ø What is available? What are the options and how best can they be used? What are the latest trends and developments taking place in Jamaica, the Caribbean and around the world? What about the emerging role of new technologies and its effect on the media and marketing industries?
This is a must attend event for opportunities to develop and secure new business, contact and network opportunities, and for anyone seeking to keep and stay ahead of the game and competitors.

Read Full Post »

The Why

Marketing and Advertising professionals clamour to expose their brand of products and services to an increasingly younger, mobile, technologically exposed and educated populous in an increasingly fragmented and specialised media environment. But, although the marketplace today abounds with opportunities, the information landscape is constantly changing and evolving, requiring these professionals to constantly stay abreast of developments and technology, in order to make better returns on media purchases and more informed media decisions.

In recognition of these opportunities, The Caribbean Media Conference and Exposition was created to provide vital information and direction to those within the industry: bringing the two groups together- media sellers and buyers. The 2007 Caribbean Media Conference and Exposition was advertised and promoted throughout the region and selected markets in the US and the surrounding region, and is expected to attract over 300 participants each day.

The theme of CMCE 2007: Consumer Engagement— key for media success.

As marketers begin to structure their 2008 marketing budget the media landscape will continue to see major changes and challenges. What is available? What are the options and how best can they be used? What are the latest trends and developments taking place in Jamaica, the Caribbean and around the world? What about the emerging role of new technologies and its effect on the media and marketing industries?

This year’s conference will see the Telecommunications sector and the Mobile/cell phone technology playing a major role. The developments taking place in this industry will continue to have a profound impact as it continues to change the face of media, as we know it. To some extent last year’s topic, “Is the telecommunications industry the new mediascape & the new frontier?” set the stage for this year’s theme. This year more time will be spent looking at these developments.

So where are we going? Let’s consider some of the perspectives taken from local and international media headlines over the past year.

The Empowered Consumers Perspective

“In an age of fragmentation and user controlled media, even door-to-door salesmen have to adjust their pitches. Consumers are increasingly less willing to open the door or their e-mail inboxes to even highly targeted and personalized pitches,”

“Marketers are chasing audiences across multiple media platforms, and even when they succeed in getting consumers’ attention, it’s getting harder to finesse a response.”People are saying, ‘No more!'” says Michele Fitzpatrick, chief marketing officer, Harte-Hanks Direct. “They don’t want to be bombarded with messages.”

The discipline best known as “direct marketing” needs a new approach that takes into account media-averse and empowered consumers. “You can’t think of them as a target,” says Kathy Sharpe, CEO, Sharpe Partners. “If anything, we are the targets.” In a world of increasingly personalized digital media, where consumers are accustomed to TiVo, RSS feeds, podcasts, wireless data on their cell phones, and customized home pages, people don’t want to be pushed into anything.

The Advertisers perspective

In the estimation of marketers, it’s no longer enough for new media to attract large numbers of users — they also must be engaged, according to media buyers on a panel organized by the International Radio-Television Society. “The new ROI, is ROA: return on attention,” said Anita Newton, VP for marketing at Kansas City, Mo.-based Sprint.

Advertisers are now employing highly skilled and trained marketing professionals who are able to do many of the account and creative servicing and coordination functions that traditional agencies are set up to do. But, should the client really be doing these things? Why not?

Many clients, dissatisfied with the level of creativity from their agencies are refusing to pay for creative output, preferring to develop their own creative message and contract a production company for its execution rather than going through an agency. For many, this is a result of the agency failing to live up to its mandate and so becoming less critical to the client’s operations.

The agency-client relationship was recently described as a relationship, in which the agency is prevented from flirting with a competitive client, but the client was free to flirt with, and even engage with another agency, in other words the agency of record was in name only.

The advertising industry perspective

Buffeted by a changing media environment, the advertising industry is being forced to re-evaluate its entire approach to doing business. Some observers say the gray flannel suits and three-martini lunches are giving way to enormous institutional changes focused on cost-cutting, consolidation and a growing aversion to risk-taking.

Are you just running a business, or are you leading a crusade? Does your agency have a sense of purpose that transcends making money? Do you have a company of workers or a company of believers? Purpose is about moving beyond success to significance. Remarkable agencies aren’t just trying to create advertising, but in some small way, change the world. Thoughts from Tim Williams, Ignition Consulting Group, and author of “Take a Stand for Your Brand.”

An excerpt from “Why Agencies Should Put a Price on Ideas,” by Claire Beal, appearing in Campaign magazine in 2006 comments, “Until agencies manage to charge for ideas, the whole pitch process will continue to see agencies squandering their most valuable assets. And business will continue being won on rates that fail to recognize the value innovative creative ideas can add to a client’s stock.”

“I believe we should be paid by the idea. If we spend four hours and the idea is worth $50 million, it doesn’t seem right to just be paid for four hours. I think it’s the compensation model that really should be looked at.” David Lubars, chairman and chief creative officer, BBDO, quoted at the 2006 ANA Agency Relations Forum in New York.

The Media Industry Perspective

And as debate and opinions rage on, the media fights to stay relevant and profitable as it faces declining revenues, demands for lower ad rates in line with reduced audiences, increased competition, audience discontent with advertising overload, increased convergence and expansion as technology drives the form and nature of this competitive field.

Media managers are questioning the sanctity of the media commission. They understand why it was put there at the inception of the industry, but cannot understand what agencies are doing today to earn it. In an environment of shrinking margins should we as media be giving up as much as 18% of our revenue to an entity that just sits between us and the advertiser?

The need to make direct pitches to agency clients is becoming more and more a requirement for media to meet revenue targets. Agencies can no longer be depended on to sell airtime and space.

Should media be involved in the production of advertisements in direct competition with advertising agencies? Does this represent a conflict or simply the media seeking to ensure that it has commercials to fill air time and space.

Where to the media? A question made all the more critical in this age of media groups formed through mergers and acquisitions driving the need for critical mass and forcing small media players to the sideline.

Should media be involved in the production of advertisements in direct competition with advertising agencies? Does this represent a conflict or simply the media seeking to ensure that it has commercials to fill air time and space.

Where to the media? A question made all the more critical in this age of media groups formed through mergers and acquisitions driving the need for critical mass and forcing small media players to the sideline.

Read Full Post »


The Hilton Kingston Jamaica is to host the renaissance of the Media Expo in the form of the Caribbean Media Conference and Expo. The brainchild of Aldo of AMK COMMUNICATIONS, the Media Expo is making a seamless transition in September 2006 in order to facilitate the inevitable integration of the Caribbean region to become part of a more global marketplace.

In the early 1990’s the country saw a boom in the economy and experienced a general liberalization, which opened the marketplace for many industries. The winds of change brought with it the dawn of the information age and Jamaicans were now given the opportunity to choose what to watch, read and listen.

Advertisers were clamouring to expose their products and services to the populous and media was abound with opportunities to help in this regard. Aldo recognized the opportunities that became available and as such the Media Expo was created to provide vital information and direction to persons within the industry.

The Expo was the perfect forum to bring both buyers and sellers together in an arena where all could walk away with the knowledge and information that would work in the interest of both the advertiser and the media. The Expo successfully harnessed the newfound freedom and was able to set the stage for the growth and development that the industry has undergone.

It has been Fourteen Years since the first staging of the Media Expo and it has come a long way. With the major decision made to make the Expo a regional affair, the 2006 Caribbean Media Conference and Expo is set to tackle vital issues that will set the stage for the future of Advertising and Media both in Jamaica and the rest of the Caribbean.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: